Značka: Spain

Spanish lawmaker sees opportunity amid Kazakhstan’s Bitcoin mining collapse

Deputy for the Spanish Ciudadanos political party María Muñoz has proposed a bill to make Spain a Bitcoin mining hotspot following the internet shutdown that caused a mining outage in Kazakhstan.The lawyer and economist Muñoz was steadfast in her support of Spain as a Bitcoin (BTC) destination, in a tweet on Friday: “The protests in Kazakhstan have repercussions all around the world but also for Bitcoin. We propose that Spain positions itself as a safe destination for investments in cryptocurrencies to develop a flexible, efficient and safe sector.”A two-page open letter accompanied the tweet directed at the Spanish Congress of Deputies. First, Muñoz highlighted the significance of the protests and the government’s response which used “all the strength of the police and the army,” before the government switched off the internet to the largest Central Asian economy. She cited a Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance study that put Kazakhstan as the second-largest Bitcoin miner worldwide, contributing an estimated 20% of the hash rate in the second half of 2021. The government’s decision to effectively pull the rug out from under Kazakhstan’s Bitcoin miners caused the hash rate to plummet a reported 13.4%.These events inspired pertinent questions for the pro-Bitcoin lawmaker:What information does the Spanish government have on the impact of the Kazakhstan internet blackout on the Spanish crypto mining industry? Will the government take measures to attract investors and miners fleeing the Kazakhstan mining industry? What data does the government have regarding the energy efficiency of Bitcoin and the growth of the mining industry?A proven proponent for the Bitcoin network, her party Ciudadanos, or “Citizens,” proposed a national strategy on cryptocurrencies in October last year. Her party seeks to position Spain as a pole for investments into cryptocurrencies from the European Union and the world — and Bitcoin mining could be the catalyst. As Bitcoin hash rate fluctuations have shown time and again, mining infrastructure is not geographically restricted. China’s mining ban, for example, was to the benefit of Kazakhstan and Kosovo. Alan Konevsky, chief legal officer at PrimeBlock, explained last year’s mining changes to Cointelegraph: “Mining companies including those that relocated after the China regulatory changes, set up in countries like Kazakhstan and Kosovo because the cost of electricity is much cheaper than in North America.”This was shown in Kazakhstan’s growing hash rate in 2021. However, in a premonition to what could take place in Spain, Konevsky goes on to explain: “If mining becomes a complete non-starter in these countries, we could see miners relocate. This industry is mobile, to a point — but as it matures it requires stability, including stable political climate and stable inputs, including energy.”Muñoz hopes that Spain harbors these Bitcoin-friendly factors. However, one of BTC’s biggest headwinds may be political. Her tweet inspired ridicule from rival Green party member Ernest Urtasun, a European Parliament member. Labeling her proposal a “bad joke” in a tweet, he said BTC mining is “an environmental aberration.” Muñoz and her Citizens party clearly have their work cut out.

Čítaj viac

Spanish LGBT token responds to critics, says it expects listings soon

Spanish LGBT-related token MariCoin (MCOIN) has responded to the community following skepticism around the project’s concept and goals.Some had even criticized the project for its name, which played on a homophobic slur in Spanish. But according to key people in the project, they have simply misunderstood. MariCoin CEO Francisco Alvarez told Cointelegraph that the project’s name is about “turning an insult into a fortress,” referring to peculiarities of tackling homophobic language as the very word word “gay” is still being used as an insult in some communities.“In Spain it is very common for members of the gay community to call themselves ‘Maricón,’ so Juan, an active member of the community, thought MariCoin was a fantastic name for a cryptocurrency that would unite the whole community,” Alvarez said.The CEO noted that the MariCoin project has “found a generalized acceptance” of over 90% in other Spanish-speaking countries like Argentina, Venezuela, Cuba, Mexico, Uruguay, Ecuador, and others. “Although we must work on that other 10% that does not share our vision,” he noted.According to MariCoin co-founder and president Juan Belmonte, the project expects to list its Algorand-based token on crypto exchanges supporting the Algorand blockchain on Jan. 31.“We have been in talks since September 2021, as we have announced, to list on Binance. Our CTO is working on the white paper and we will have the first version ready next week,” Belmonte told Cointelegraph.He also noted that MariCoin has closed their waiting list at 10,000 “Maricoiners,” as committed in their roadmap. “Due to the avalanche of mails, we have had to open a second list to reserve the coin at the starting price of $0.025, starting next January 31,” the executive added. Some people in the community previously were skeptical about MariCoin’s waiting list for investing via Google Forms.Related: New LGBTQ token aims for equity but raises red flags with communityBelmonte also mentioned that MariCoin was selected for the Algorand Foundation accelerator program in Miami last year, with support from blockchain investment firm Borderless Capital. Apart from MariCoin, the accelerator also selected 9 other startups including Latin American digital bank NeoMoon, blockchain game Alchemon, nonfungible token platform Dartroom, and others.The Algorand Foundation and Borderless Capital did not immediately respond to Cointelegraph’s request for comment.

Čítaj viac

New LGBT token aims for equity but raises red flags with community

The cryptocurrency community has raised concerns about Maricoin, a new token supposedly related to the LGBT+ community, with some people even suspecting the project to be a scam.Launched in December 2021, Maricoin promises to enable a “social, ethical, transparent and transversal means of payment” targeting the global “pink economy,” which is estimated to amount to trillions of dollars.One might question Maricoin’s ethics though, as its name is a portmanteau that plays on a Spanish slur for homosexuals.According to the project’s website, Maricoin runs on the Algorand blockchain, with creators planning to list the token on several crypto exchanges in 2022.The project was reportedly founded in Madrid by local hairdresser and entrepreneur Juan Belmonte, who said that the new token is designed to help the community profit by providing a new payment method for LGBT-friendly businesses worldwide.According to CEO Francisco Alvarez, as many as 8,000 people were already on a waiting list to buy Maricoin as of early January.Despite the token being widely promoted as the “first coin created by and for the LGBT+ community” on many mainstream media channels, Maricoin is not quite the first cryptocurrency project related to the LGBT+ community. As previously reported by Cointelegraph, there are a number of LGBT-related tokens and initiatives, including the LGBT token, which was launched back in 2018.Several industry observers have expressed skepticism over Maricoin, with some even alleging that the initiative could be a scam.“It’s not a coin, it’s a token, clearly a scam to catch fools who want to make easy money with crypto. Their website is poorly made, ugly and doesn’t have a single tech line about how this crypto will work. Not a single whitepaper and their waiting-list form is a damn Google Doc,” one Redditor argued.Related: Beware of sophisticated scams and rug pulls, as thugs target crypto usersJustin Ehrenhofer, vice president of operations at crypto wallet service Cake Wallet, said, “This 100% feels like a scam.”  He noted that the Reuters article on Maricoin didn’t include much skepticism on the project: This 100% feels like a scam. You need to FILL OUT A GOOGLE FORM to indicate how much you want to “invest” in “MariCoin”? Yet @enriqueanarte @TRF publishes this likely scam, without much skepticism. *Maybe* everyone involved is oblivious, but this appears to be a textbook scam 🙁 https://t.co/3TY4NfyDgQ pic.twitter.com/j1ZQaZea8G— Justin Ehrenhofer ️‍ (@JEhrenhofer) January 4, 2022Maricoin did not immediately respond to Cointelegraph’s request for comment. This article will be updated pending any new information.

Čítaj viac
Načítava

Získaj BONUS 8 € v Bitcoinoch

nakup bitcoin z karty

Registrácia Binance

Burza Binance

Aktuálne kurzy